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South Carolina State Flower

The South Carolina State Flower is the Yellow Jessamine. Known by other names such the Poor Man’s Rope, The Pride of Augusta, or its scientific name, the Gelsemium sempervirens, it is truly a southern belle.

Praised by many for its floral, sweet scent that fills the damp, Southern air, it was officially adopted as the South Carolina State Flower by the state’s General Assembly on February 1, 1924. This renowned flower has been an integral part of the state’s history and is found in every county throughout the state. In 1906 the Yellow Jessamine became the emblem of the Dixie Chapter, of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. This prompted Mrs. Teresa Strickland of Anderson, South Carolina, to write a poem on the flower called, “Legend of the Yellow Jessamine.” In her poem she wrote: “No flower that blooms holds such perfume, / As kindness and sympathy won. / Wherever there grows the sheltering pine / Is clinging a Yellow Jessamine vine.”

Although found throughout the state, the Yellow Jessamine is found in overabundance throughout the woods and the coastal plains of South Carolina. The South Carolina State Flower stretches down the Virginia coastline to South Florida and heads westward through the hills of Arkansas and into flatlands of Texas. During the winter months from December to March, the woody vine blooms and covers the landscape in with its famous golden petals and its floral scent.

For centuries the Yellow Jessamine has been used by herbalists to serve a variety of purposes, including to treat eye ailments and to serve as a natural, perfumed oil of one’s hair. The roots and the rhizomes of the plant have been used to treat the central nervous system, serving as a depressant, febrifuge, anodyne, and antispasmodic. As it is difficult to reproduce a similar synthetic odor, the perfume industry extracts the natural oils from the plant to create one-of-a-kind perfumes. Although the South Carolina State Flower is visual stimulating to look at, and its aroma stimulates the senses, the plant itself is highly poisonous. While butterflies feast on its nectar and deer chew through on its leaves and fibers, livestock who feed on the plant can become ill. For them, it can possibly be a fatal decision.

The Yellow Jessamine grows as a vine in clusters along the South Carolina terrain, on fences, and upon the trees. The leaves of the South Carolina State Flower are generally one to four inches long and an inch wide. The funnel-shaped flowers are small in size, measuring only an inch in diameter. The fruit from the Yellow Jessamine is a small capsule roughly an inch long containing flat, winged seeds within each capsule. These capsules normally ripen from October to June, the opposite from many other plants in the region.

It is quite easy to understand how the Yellow Jessamine has stood the test of time in the state of South Carolina. The beauty of the petals, the scent of its sweet nectar, and the ties to the states history as ensure the loyalty and favoritism by the state’s residents.

Praised by many for its floral, sweet scent that fills the damp, Southern air, it was officially adopted as the South Carolina State Flower by the state’s General Assembly on February 1, 1924. This renowned flower has been an integral part of the state’s history and is found in every county throughout the state. In 1906 the Yellow Jessamine became the emblem of the Dixie Chapter, of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. This prompted Mrs. Teresa Strickland of Anderson, South Carolina, to write a poem on the flower called, “Legend of the Yellow Jessamine.” In her poem she wrote: “No flower that blooms holds such perfume, / As kindness and sympathy won. / Wherever there grows the sheltering pine / Is clinging a Yellow Jessamine vine.”

Although found throughout the state, the Yellow Jessamine is found in overabundance throughout the woods and the coastal plains of South Carolina. The South Carolina State Flower stretches down the Virginia coastline to South Florida and heads westward through the hills of Arkansas and into flatlands of Texas. During the winter months from December to March, the woody vine blooms and covers the landscape in with its famous golden petals and its floral scent.

For centuries the Yellow Jessamine has been used by herbalists to serve a variety of purposes, including to treat eye ailments and to serve as a natural, perfumed oil of one’s hair. The roots and the rhizomes of the plant have been used to treat the central nervous system, serving as a depressant, febrifuge, anodyne, and antispasmodic. As it is difficult to reproduce a similar synthetic odor, the perfume industry extracts the natural oils from the plant to create one-of-a-kind perfumes. Although the South Carolina State Flower is visual stimulating to look at, and its aroma stimulates the senses, the plant itself is highly poisonous. While butterflies feast on its nectar and deer chew through on its leaves and fibers, livestock who feed on the plant can become ill. For them, it can possibly be a fatal decision.

The Yellow Jessamine grows as a vine in clusters along the South Carolina terrain, on fences, and upon the trees. The leaves of the South Carolina State Flower are generally one to four inches long and an inch wide. The funnel-shaped flowers are small in size, measuring only an inch in diameter. The fruit from the Yellow Jessamine is a small capsule roughly an inch long containing flat, winged seeds within each capsule. These capsules normally ripen from October to June, the opposite from many other plants in the region.

It is quite easy to understand how the Yellow Jessamine has stood the test of time in the state of South Carolina. The beauty of the petals, the scent of its sweet nectar, and the ties to the states history as ensure the loyalty and favoritism by the state’s residents.



 
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